Maya Ramsay's blog

A unique process is used to lift off the top layer of surfaces from historically and politically significant sites and to re-present them.
These works capture the histories imbued in architectural surfaces, whilst referencing the idea of walls as witnesses and walls as weapons.
Maya frequently works with sites that have a historical relationship to armed conflict and that are due to be demolished or renovated- capturing histories that would otherwise be lost.
Nov 11 '11
SHADOW LINES 
ANNE HARILD | ROSE O’GALLIVAN | MAYA RAMSAY
9 November – 10 December 2011Wed-Fri 11-6, Sat 11-4  T I N T Y P EThird Floor18 St Cross Street
London EC1 8UN
info@tintypegallery.com 5 minutes walk from Farringdon/Chancery Lane Underground Palimpsests and left-over traces can be glimpsed every day, particularly in a city: pieces of time left hanging. SHADOW LINES features the work of three artists who source the material presence of past fragments. 
Maya Ramsay works with buildings due to be demolished or renovated. She is currently working at Bletchley Park in the huts used by the code-breakers. Ramsay has developed a process of lifting pigment, debris and the texture of surfaces to create a kind of epidermis. These are presented, like paintings, on the wall but they are simultaneously archaeological documents. Their titles, which refer to military conflicts and death tolls, suggest a political undertow in Ramsay’s presentation of rejected, left behind strata. 
Anne Harild’s stop frame animation, Looking Glass, uses discarded window frames to reflect an entirely different architectural space: the Victorian church in which she was working. The film evokes glimpses of a place and the passage of time. Harild describes it as a performance she has set up in which it is the space that performs. 
Rose O’Gallivan’s work pivots on the idea that the mute can be presented. Contradicting the presumption that a work has a message or needs to inform, O’Gallivan is more interested in absence creating a presence. Leftover traces, that can be as minimal as the mark left in a piece of folded material, become part of print/paper/fabric/sculptural installations. She often crops or obstructs images in a way that foregrounds textures and materials.
Image: Bloodletting (detail), surface lifted from wall, 2010, Maya Ramsay

SHADOW LINES 

ANNE HARILD | ROSE O’GALLIVAN | MAYA RAMSAY

9 November – 10 December 2011Wed-Fri 11-6, Sat 11-4  T I N T Y P EThird Floor18 St Cross Street

London EC1 8UN

info@tintypegallery.com 5 minutes walk from Farringdon/Chancery Lane Underground Palimpsests and left-over traces can be glimpsed every day, particularly in a city: pieces of time left hanging. SHADOW LINES features the work of three artists who source the material presence of past fragments. 

Maya Ramsay works with buildings due to be demolished or renovated. She is currently working at Bletchley Park in the huts used by the code-breakers. Ramsay has developed a process of lifting pigment, debris and the texture of surfaces to create a kind of epidermis. These are presented, like paintings, on the wall but they are simultaneously archaeological documents. Their titles, which refer to military conflicts and death tolls, suggest a political undertow in Ramsay’s presentation of rejected, left behind strata. 

Anne Harild’s stop frame animation, Looking Glass, uses discarded window frames to reflect an entirely different architectural space: the Victorian church in which she was working. The film evokes glimpses of a place and the passage of time. Harild describes it as a performance she has set up in which it is the space that performs. 

Rose O’Gallivan’s work pivots on the idea that the mute can be presented. Contradicting the presumption that a work has a message or needs to inform, O’Gallivan is more interested in absence creating a presence. Leftover traces, that can be as minimal as the mark left in a piece of folded material, become part of print/paper/fabric/sculptural installations. She often crops or obstructs images in a way that foregrounds textures and materials.

Image: Bloodletting (detail), surface lifted from wall, 2010, Maya Ramsay